How can you pay income tax without having a job?

I’m a out of state college student and one of the requirements for receiving in-state tuition is to pay Income Tax. The problem is that I don’t have a job. I could get one but that will add more stress to my already stressful life of college. Help!

First, the requirement is to file a state income Tax Return as a resident. There is no requirement to pay something that you don’t owe. As long as you fill out the return correctly and it says that no tax is due, you don’t have to pay anything; you just have to file it.

Second, you pay exactly the same way as if you do have a job. One thing has nothing with the other (except that the job affects the amount that you pay). Many other types of income are taxed, including gambling, interest, dividends, capital gains, alimony, jury duty pay, IRA distributions, social security, etc., etc. Many taxpayers don’t have jobs.

If you don’t have a job, but you do have other income, then you fill out the return, exactly the same way as if you did have a job, except with nothing on the line for the amount of money made at the job, and you pay whatever the tax is, by check or money order or electronically, exactly the same way as if you did have a job.

If you don’t have any income, from any source (except for loans, which are not taxed when you borrow the money, but are taxed later if they get canceled or forgiven), then you fill out the return, with your name, address, etc., but put down nothing for the amount of income, and you send it, exactly the same way as if you did have a job, except without paying any money.

5 thoughts on “How can you pay income tax without having a job?

  1. You don’t – they are making you prove that you actually moved to the state to reside, not to go to college. One of the ways to prove you actually reside in the state and are not just trying to get in-state discounts is to show that you are living independently. In order to live independently, you must have some form of income not contributed by someone else (i.e., a parent).

    You already said you are an out-of-state student, so there is probably not going to be any way to qualify for in-state tuition (and since you are not a resident, you shouldn’t be able to qualify).
    References :

  2. To qualify for in-state tuition rates you must be a resident. If you are from out-of-state, you must have lived in the state for the minimum time set by law (typically 2 years) and have supported yourself BEFORE you apply for admission to state schools. In your situation, you must:

    1. Drop out of school.
    2. Get a job in state and live in the state and support yourself for 2 full years and pay taxes on your income.
    3. Reapply for admission and pick up where you left off.
    References :

  3. most states charge higher tuition to students who are not residents of the state–only fair to citizens who pay for the maintenance of state college institutions
    getting qualifed for in state tuition is based on your residence, ie. you probably need to live in the state and establish residency there to be able to get in state tuition
    if you need to have some kind of income to report, you need to get a job
    References :

  4. You have to be a resident for a year before being treated as a resident. Having a job and filing a tax return is one way of proving it but is not mandatory. You (well not yourself you) could have nothing but pension income and have to file a tax return.
    References :

  5. First, the requirement is to file a state income tax return as a resident. There is no requirement to pay something that you don’t owe. As long as you fill out the return correctly and it says that no tax is due, you don’t have to pay anything; you just have to file it.

    Second, you pay exactly the same way as if you do have a job. One thing has nothing with the other (except that the job affects the amount that you pay). Many other types of income are taxed, including gambling, interest, dividends, capital gains, alimony, jury duty pay, IRA distributions, social security, etc., etc. Many taxpayers don’t have jobs.

    If you don’t have a job, but you do have other income, then you fill out the return, exactly the same way as if you did have a job, except with nothing on the line for the amount of money made at the job, and you pay whatever the tax is, by check or money order or electronically, exactly the same way as if you did have a job.

    If you don’t have any income, from any source (except for loans, which are not taxed when you borrow the money, but are taxed later if they get canceled or forgiven), then you fill out the return, with your name, address, etc., but put down nothing for the amount of income, and you send it, exactly the same way as if you did have a job, except without paying any money.
    References :

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